Defense

Defense

Warfare in the 21st century has changed dramatically when compared to warfare in previous centuries.  Historically, the only way to collect information about enemy troop movement was to send out a team of two soldiers to wait and watch for the enemy to move and then report the intelligence back to command.  However, during times of poor visibility or when the soldiers are fatigued, they may miss some critical movements.

Today, however, the Department of Defense has a new tool in its tool belt: deployable, wireless sensors.  While some are placed by soldiers, the most useful ones are deployed by artillery and air drop into locations that are simply too dangerous for soldiers to patrol.  However, only the most durable batteries can survive the impulse of a parachute-free air drop or an artillery deployment.  This means that the service life of the sensors is limited by the size of the battery pack.  Ruggedizing our generator enough to withstand these forces would allow continual data collection for extended periods of time, not only saving money, but also saving soldiers lives.

For tactical missions, soldiers have to carry batteries with them.  This limits the duration of the missions as well as the distance that can be covered.  Using our generator as a renewable energy source, batteries can be charged, allowing the mission to be extended as long as necessary.

One major defense issue–especially in the US–is that of border patrol.  The border between the US and Canada is the longest in the world with much of it very difficult to patrol.  So, sensors must be used to monitor activity along the border.  Due to the remoteness of the border, many of the sensors have to be deployed by air drop, with a very limited service life.  Deploying sensors equipped with our generator would pay for itself after just one replacement sensor does not have to be deployed.  By bringing down the cost of border monitoring, countries would be able to more effectively.